Old Devil Moon Launches Weekend Brunch Service

Old Devil Moon is already known for the tasty Cajun food and cocktails they serve nightly at 3472 Mission Street, near the intersection with Cortland. Now co-owner Chris Cohen tells Bernalwood that ODM will also open early on weekends for brunch, starting this Saturday:

We’re excited to announce we’re launching Saturday and Sunday brunch at Old Devil Moon beginning this coming weekend, Dec 9th and 10th!

We’re calling it Black Magic Brunch, and so far the reactions to the dishes and drinks during our word-of-mouth soft opening test run have been overwhelmingly positive.

We can’t wait to have the public come check it out. We’re also stoked to be opening at 11AM on Saturday and Sunday from now on (rather than 5PM), so we can serve hungry and thirsty patrons all day long.

Naturally, ODM’s brunch menu leans heavily on hearty favorites such as shrimp and grits, fried chicken and biscuits, huevos rancheros, and loco moco. There’s also a tasty selection of breackfast cocktails as well. Check out the complete bunch menu right here.

PHOTO: Inside Old Devil Moon, courtesy of Old Devil Moon

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Leaves 1 Dead, 5 Stricken on Moultrie Street

One neighbor died and five others were stricken in the early morning hours today following a carbon monoxide poisoning incident at a Bernal Heights home on the 300 block of Moultrie, near the intersection of Eugenia.

ABC7 reports:

Firefighters were called to the scene at 4:26 a.m. A carbon monoxide alarm was going off in the residence. Four residents on the upper level of the home were able to get out and were treated at the scene. Two residents on the lower level of the home were impacted by the carbon monoxide. An elderly woman was taken to the hospital in serious condition. An elderly male died at the scene after firefighters tried for 45 minutes to save his life using CPR and other life-saving methods.

The last known incident of carbon monoxide poisoning in Bernal Heights happened at a home on Cortland Avenue in 2012.

Thursday: Come All Ye Bernal for the 2017 Holiday Stroll

Holiday Stroll

stroll.singers

Tens of thousands of years ago, in the time of our Bernal ancestors, a joyous community of elves lived on Bernal Hill. Each year, during the early days of the winter season, these proto-Bernalese would gather on the land we now call Cortlandia to celebrate the arrival of the season of lights.

Today, the Bernal Business Alliance carries on this ancient ritual, in the form of the glamorous Cortland Holiday Stroll. The 2017 Holiday Stroll happens this Thursday, Dec. 7, from 6 to 9 pm, and Bernalese of all ages are invited to partake of the festivities.

Neighbor Laurie from BBA tells Bernalwood:

Come one, come all, to the 8th annual Bernal Heights Holiday Stroll, this Thursday, December 7th from 6:00 – 9:00 along Cortland Avenue!

Stores will be open to help you with your local holiday shopping, and they’ll be offering treats and libations along the way. There will also be live music and caroling to add to the festivities.

The Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center at 513 Cortland, will be taking photos with Santa and strollers of all ages, for a recommended donation of $5.00. They are also collecting new, unwrapped toys for their annual toy drive until December 15th, so buy a little extra to give back this season.

Happy holidays, and see you there!

Check out the BBA website for more detail on participating merchants and their extra-special Stroll festivities.

XXL Supermoon Looked Supercool From Bernal Heights

Did you notice the moon last night? It looked rather XXL in last night’s clear skies — so much so that you might have been tempted to say, “That’s no moon… it’s a space station!” But no, it was really just the moon,  at the apogee of its orbit around the Earth, creating a visual effect known as a supermoon.

The XXL effect was still in place as the sun rose this morning, when Neighbor Steve snapped this wonderful photo of the moon alongside Sutro Tower. Lovely!

Crowdfunding Underway to Help Bernal Family Left Homeless After Gas Explosion

The Godoy family lost their home after Monday’s gas explosion. (Photo: via  GoFundMe)

This story was written by Fiona Lee from Hoodline.

A Bernal Heights family is now homeless after a Monday morning gas explosion tore through their home.

The Godoy family—Carlos, 70, Carmen, 72, and their 43-year-old son Carlos, who is deaf—lost all of their belongings.

The explosion also wrecked their only car, which was used for doctor appointments and transportation to work.

The younger Carlos was home when the explosion occurred, but escaped uninjured after it blew out the windows.

“I think what happened in my house, the roof was very bad. Everything is coming down,” Carmen told ABC7 when she returned to the wreckage of her home.

Through the American Red Cross, the family is housed in a motel until Monday. The charity also provided the family with money for incidentals.

The family is also raising funds through GoFundMe. As of press time, they have raised $3,300 out of their $6,000 goal.

PG&E is still investigating the cause of the gas leak and the subsequent explosion.

Updated: Gas Leak and Explosion Damages Mission Street Home in Bernal Heights

Damage at 3971 Mission Street, as shown by KTVU.

A gas leak triggered an explosion that damaged a home at 3971 Mission Street in Bernal Heights, near the intersection of St. Mary’s Ave.

There are no current reports of injuries, but Mission Street is closed in the area and an evacuation order is in effect. PG&E crews are also on the scene.

KTVU’s helicopter captured aerial footage from the scene:

 

UPDATE (Nov. 27, 2:15 pm) Fiona Lee from Hoodline shares these details on the incident:

According to Division Chief Rex Hale, who was on scene, the most likely reason for the explosion was gas filling up in the garage of the two-story building and hitting a pilot light.

The “uncommon” explosion occurred as firefighters walked up inside the building at around 10am, accompanied by a “heavy smell of gas,” said Hale.

The incident blew out the front windows of the building at 3987 Mission Street. No one was at home at the time, and no injuries have been reported.

Roughly 100 people from 19 addresses on the 3900 block of Mission St., the 100 block of Bosworth and the 100 block of College Terrace were evacuated. There is no timeline yet for when they will be able to return to their homes.

Meet Jack Hart, the New Captain at SFPD Ingleside Station

Capt. Jack Hart at an Oct. 2017 community meeting in Bernal Heights.

This interview was originally published at Hoodline by reporter Will Carruthers and was created in partnership with the Ingleside-Excelsior Light. The interview has been edited and condensed.

On October 21, Captain Jack Hart, an 18-year member of the San Francisco Police Department, took the top post at Ingleside Station, which covers the city’s second-largest policing district.

We spoke with Hart about his background, his first month in charge and the challenges he expects to face.

Hoodline: What’s your background with the SFPD?

Jack Hart: My great-grandfather, Charles W. King, was a streetcar driver going up and down Market Street. He and his wife, Georgia King, had their first son right around April 1906. When the great quake hit on April 18, the hospital they were in collapsed, and Charles joined the Police Department immediately.

His star number was 596, the same star number I wear. He served for 25 years [before being] hit and killed by a drunk driver while acting as a crossing guard for school kids on Alemany Boulevard in 1931.

I grew up in Diamond Heights and I currently live in Sunnyside, both in the Ingleside District. Generations of my family have lived in Ingleside District, yet I have never policed the area because I have worked at four of the other stations: Southern, Tenderloin, Mission and Bayview-Hunters Point.

I’m also an attorney, so I spent several years in our legal office acting as an attorney on behalf of the Police Department in civil, criminal, state and federal courts.

I joined the department in June 1999, so I’m relatively new in the department but I have a lot of family experience. I was a police cadet with the Police Activities League when I was 14.

With all of those connections, it’s not just a professional accomplishment to be the captain of Ingleside Station, it’s also a personal mission because I’m so connected to this district. I want this place to be great too.

How have you spent your first month on the job?

I’ve spent the entire month trying to figure out the cops, the community and the crime, and not necessarily in that order.

I’ve probably been to about 30 community meetings so far. It’s been great because everyone is so motivated to fix these neighborhood issues. I’d be really concerned if there were only three or four people showing up to these meetings, but most of them have 30 or 40, which is great.

Even if they’re yelling at me, it shows me they care.

What are some of the unique features of Ingleside Station and what do you think will be some of the biggest challenges?

One of the challenges of the Ingleside is that it’s a big district. I think we’re about 25 percent of the city, about the size of Daly City with the population of Daly City, basically shoved into one police district. It’s a lot of real estate to cover.

All of that creates this challenge that we are really reliant on our police cars to cover the distance, which kind of sucks, to be frank.

Our challenge is that our cops are all in their cars. They put an average of 50 to 60 miles a day in the car.

One of the challenges is getting officers out of their cars to engage on a block-by-block basis, so that they can understand the unique challenges and strengths of each neighborhood—especially in areas that have violence issues like Visitacion Valley in the Sunnydale neighborhoods.

We’re spending a lot of time down there, and other neighborhoods are not necessarily getting the same investment on a day-to-day basis.

The biggest challenge is that we need more cops. We’re probably a good 25 to 30 cops short of where we should be in terms of all our responsibilities and all the things we need.