Then and Now: Cortland at Nevada, 1931

cortland.nevada.1931

cortland.nevada.2016

Here’s fun comparison showing the view from Cortland Ave. looking east from Nevada St. That’s July 31, 1931 up above, and January 18, 2016 below.

The most surprising thing about the two photos is that (apart from the sepia-tone coloring and more modern cars) the streetscape from this location hasn’t changed a whole lot in the last 85 years. The buildings on all four corners of the Nevada intersection are still in place and mostly unchanged.

Look a little more closely, and there’s one charming detail from way-back-when: There’s a young girl near the northwest corner riding a scooter down the hill toward Bayshore. Without a helmet! <Insert horrified parental gasp>

nevadascooter

But in a more substantive way, the view from this angle is somewhat misleading. Yes, the view looks similar today when you look down the hill, but when you’re at the bottom of the hill looking up, the changes are far more dramatic.

Here’s what that looked like. This is the view from Cortland at Bayshore, looking up the hill toward Nevada. There’s no date on this photo, but the cars on Cortland tell us it’s from roughly the same era as the older photo above; circa mid-1920s or early 1930s:

bayshorecortland

Different! That first left turn is Hilton Street, and the embankment behind it now supports the highway 101 overpass. But most noteworthy is the big row of greenhouses visible just up the hill on the north side of Cortland. And, of course, no houses!

IMAGES: 1931 view, via UC Berkeley Bancroft Library. 2016 view by Telstar Logistics. View from Bayshore courtesy of the Bernal Heights History Project. 

7 thoughts on “Then and Now: Cortland at Nevada, 1931

  1. A friend lived on the top floor apartment of the building on the southwest corner of Cortland & Nevada. I even housesat for her. It was very much in its original state and one could think they were living in another century.

  2. So many of these old photos look similar in that they make the neighborhoods look like ghost towns. SF had over 600,000, but where were they? They weren’t home watching TV or playing video games.

  3. Pingback: This Weekend: Ride a Vintage Muni Bus (Almost) to Bernal Heights — for Free | Bernalwood

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